Project: Power-Up™

Bullying Prevention Training Program.

Project: Power-Up™

Project: Power-Up | Guide

The Project: Power-Up™ | Guide program is designed to train educators how to recognize, report, and refuse bullying. The program provides an exceptional opportunity for educators to build and expand their bullying prevention knowledge and skills.

Program Details

The Project: Power-Up™ | Guide program includes: an entrance interview with the school leadership team; 1-hour online staff orientation session; 36-hour online training for all educators within an elementary, middle, or high school; and 4 hours of policy making, implementation, and evaluation training.

Project: Power-Up | Summit

The Project: Power-Up™ | Summit program is designed to train students in grades 9, 10, 11, or 12 how to recognize, report, and refuse bullying. This online program builds upon the knowledge and skills gained in the Project: Power-Up™ | Climb, and Project: Power-Up™ | Base Camp programs and provides an exceptional opportunity for students to reinforce and further expand their bullying prevention skills.

Program Details

The Project: Power-Up™ | Summit program includes: an entrance interview with the school leadership team; 1-hour online staff orientation session; 36-hour online training for students and educators; and 18 hours of policy making, implementation and evaluation training, role-playing, and program support with Project: Power-Up™ team leaders.

Project: Power-Up | Climb

The Project: Power-Up™ | Climb program is designed to train students in grades 6-8 how to recognize, report, and refuse bullying. This online program builds upon the knowledge and skills gained in the Project: Power-Up™ | Base Camp program and provides an exceptional opportunity for students to reinforce and expand their bullying prevention skills.

Program Details

The Project: Power-Up™ | Climb program includes: an entrance interview with the school leadership team; 1-hour online staff orientation session; 36-hour online training for students and educators; and 18 hours of policy making, implementation and evaluation training, role-playing, and program support with Project: Power-Up™ team leaders.

Project: Power-Up | Base Camp

The Project: Power-Up™ | Base Camp program is designed to train students in grades 3-5 how to recognize, report, and refuse bullying. This online program provides an exceptional opportunity for students to begin building bullying prevention knowledge and skills.

Program Details

The Project: Power-Up™ | Base Camp program includes: an entrance interview with the school leadership team; 1-hour online staff orientation session; 36-hour online training for students and educators; and 18 hours of policy making, implementation and evaluation training, role-playing, and program support with Project: Power-Up™ team leaders.

Program Notes

All prices include downloadable manuals, forms, certificates of completion, and graduation tassels for students who become their school's "Peaceguards.".

Trainees must attend all 36 hours to receive a certificate of completion. The Project: Power-Up™ bullying prevention program meets all of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program Guidelines.

We recommend you take advantage of our interactive tool to determine your Peace Peddlers investment. The Peace Peddlers Investment Tool is designed to walk you through key program investment details including supplies, participation fees, and professional development. 

Bullying

What is Bullying?

Until the 1990’s, the term bullying was virtually absent from our cultural consciousness. However, a dramatic shift occurred in the United States and Europe when Swedish researcher, Dan Olweus, conducted a study on the harmful effects of bullying on students. Fast forward to the late 1990’s and 2000’s, research on the connection between school shootings, peer aggression, and digital abuse further solidified that the dynamics of bullying were wide-ranging and complex. In 1994, George Robinson presented his definition of bullying to the British Association for the Advancement of Science during the time Olweus was conducting his research in Sweden. Robinson defined bullying as “an interaction that establishes group identity, dominance, and status at the expense of another.” Pepler and Craig (2000) enhanced the research on bullying literature by identifying that violence continues over a person’s lifespan and can be identified on a continuum. In this continuum, as the child matures, his or her crimes escalate and ensues a cost to society. In a study on the economic costs of bullying in Australian schools, researchers found that the costs of bullying continue over the lifespan and cost society $1.8 billion for a group of students over 20-year period. These costs include lack of productivity in

the workplace, health issues, and violence.

The Bullying Continuum

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Dr. Ken Rigby, an Australian bullying expert, found several reasons why students exhibit bullying behaviors in schools. He identifies five different theories.

For schools, stopping bullying behavior has been the focus for over 20 years, but George Robinson postulated that this behavior could not change through policy alone. He believed that bullying behavior could be reduced through the teaching of higher value skills such as empathy, consideration, and unselfishness. Creative Response to Conflict discovered some overarching themes that educators need to be aware of before instituting a bullying curriculum or program.

  1. The terms victim and bully are stigmatizing – anyone can exhibit bullying behavior and become the target of bullying. Programs and curricula should not further stigmatize students.
  2. Bullying behavior is harmful to the perpetrator and target of the behavior. The effects of bullying can impact healthy mental, emotional, and social development and lead to criminal behavior, abusive behavior, and incarceration.  In choosing a program or curriculum, it should cover healthy emotional and social development.
  3. Bullying requires adult intervention and schools need to develop clear firm rules and protocols. Programs and curriculum must enforce reporting and consequences.
  4. Students can learn and develop skills and attitudes to protect themselves from bullying.These skills include prevention and intervention skills.

Measuring Effectiveness

Before implementing a response to bullying, the US Department of Justice encourages administrators to measure how serious the problem of bullying is in their school. After implementation, the school will determine the effectiveness of the response.  Determining a problem allows the administration to:

  • Determine success of efforts;
  • Determine if modifications need to be made;
  • Signify if the program is producing results.

Appropriate measurable variables of a program include:

  • # of targets
  • Types of bullying
  • # of chronic bullying
  • Frequency of bullying
  • % of bullying reported by students, staff, and parents
  • How students respond to bullying
  • % of witnesses and how they report bullying
  • Willingness of students to intervene
  • Attendance, tardies, behavior, discipline of both targets and bullies
  • Hot spots for bullying

Effective Approaches for Preventing Bullying in Schools

Dan Olweus found that one-time approaches for bullying prevention are less effective than implementing a whole school approach.  Also, researchers found that starting a program in elementary grades was more successful, in the long term, rather than waiting until middle and high school.  When implementing a bullying program or curriculum, here are some guidelines:

  1. It is imperative that a program or curriculum have administrative support. A school has a much higher success rate of reducing bullying when the principal is committed.
  2. A program or curriculum must be multifaceted and comprehensive. A suitable curriculum should include:
  • School-wide bullying policies and protocols in which staff, students, and parents should be aware;
  • provide guidelines for reporting;
  • Implementation of strategies to help both students who bully and students who are the targets of bullying;·      
  • Encourage students to help classmates experiencing bullying;
  • General awareness of self;
  • An opportunity for self-reflection;
  • Empathy;
  • Self-regulation;
  • Social skills;
  • Assertiveness;
  • Problem Solving;
  • Confidence;
  • An opportunity to rehearse behaviors different from previous ones;
  • Conduct post-intervention surveys about the effectiveness of the program/curriculum.

Choosing a Curriculum

A bullying prevention curriculum should be taught in a formal setting as part of a group training or special prosocial skill training. The aim of the curriculum intervention is to help students develop knowledge, form healthy values, and demonstrate skills to improve the school culture.  The curriculum can be integrated into an existing curriculum area as modules in courses such as social sciences and/or health classes.

Implementation

When implementing a curriculum, researchers found that an eight-week psycho-educational, collaborative, present focused course is highly effective. The program should help students make connections between behaviors and personal experiences. Some techniques used can include:

Project: Power-Up

Project: Power-Up

Promoting Positive Student Action: Power-Up!

After taking the course or program, students should be moved to action. This is where Project: Power-Up is effective. Some action steps include:

  • Applying to be a Peaceguard;
  • Taking Peaceguard training;
  • Forming Peaceguard patrols where students identify intimidating ways of speaking and approaching people and applying upstander skills; assisting students in crisis or who are alone; help students who are vulnerable (new students, students with disabilities, younger students, etc.);
  • Presenting information to younger students;
  • Mentoring younger students;
  • Peer mentoring;
  • Making a classroom presentation;
  • Leading social campaigns against bullying like: Mix It Up, Capri Sun’s Together Table, Unity Day, Students With a Solution, World Bullying Prevention Day, Conflict Resolution Day, #BlueUp, National Block It Out Day, #See Me Campaign, National Culture Week, Dating Violence Awareness, Youth Violence Awareness, No Name Calling Week, Say Hello, and No One Eats Alone.

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